Date: Fri, 29 Jun 2007 14:44:04 -0400
Reply-To: List Moderator <ecgrants**At_Symbol_Here**UVM.EDU>
Sender: DCHAS-L Discussion List <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**LIST.UVM.EDU>
From: List Moderator <ecgrants**At_Symbol_Here**UVM.EDU>
Subject: Boston CHAS abstracts: Safety in Nanotechnology Research** (BIOHW)

Safety in Nanotechnology Research** (BIOHW)

CHAS 7
A scientific perspective on the need for and future of nanotechnology
Joseph M. Pickel1, Phillip F. Britt2, and Linda Horton1. (1) Center  
for Nanophase
Materials Science, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley  
Road, Oak
Ridge, TN 37831-6494, pickeljm**At_Symbol_Here**ornl.gov, (2) Center for Nanophase  
Materials
Sciences and Chemical Science Division, Oak Ridge National  
Laboratory, Oak
Ridge, TN 37831-6197

The prefix nano-has been used to describe various new materials and  
products as well as new areas of scientific research. While the  
implications of this technology have been described in everything  
from fiction and commentary to scientific journals, the reality of  
the situation is that nanotechnology describes a vast and quickly  
growing field of topics that share a common length scale. In this  
talk, the presenters-who have a vested interest in the success of  
nanotechnology-hope to provide an objective survey of the present  
status and future prospects of nanotechnology from a scientific  
viewpoint.

CHAS 8
A regulatory outlook for "nanosafety"
Kimberly Begley Jeskie, Physical Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge  
National
Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, MS-6230, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6230,
jeskiekb**At_Symbol_Here**ornl.gov

A number of Federal and State regulatory agencies, professional  
organizations and organizations known for developing consensus  
standards are taking an increasing interest in the handling and use  
of materials at the nano-scale. This talk will present the status and  
outlook of standards and guidance documents that may affect the  
future of this field of science.

CHAS 9
The interactions of nanoparticles with cells: Is nano neccesarily bad
Miriam Rafailovich, Material Science, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY
11794-2275, miriam.rafailovich**At_Symbol_Here**sunysb.edu, and Nadine Pernodet,  
Department
of Materials Science and Engineering, State University of New York at  
Stony
Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794

In order to fully understand whether a nanoparticle has deleterious  
effects on human health, it is first neccesary to understant its  
interaction with living tissue at the cellular level. Observations of  
different classes of nanoparticles reveals that not all nanparticles  
are deleterious to cell developement. In fact clays can be benefitial  
and we show that it can enhance cell adhesion and protein self  
organization, in many cases. Mettalic nanoparticles, on the other  
hand can be quite toxic and interfere with normal cell function. Here  
the rate of penetration, as well as the mechanism does depend on  
particle size. We show that the presence of nanoparticles do not  
prevent the cells from dividing. On the other hancd certain basic  
functions, such as migration, morphology, and mechanical properties  
of both cell and ECM are significantly affected.

CHAS 10
Applying control banding in the determination of control measures in
laboratories using nanoparticles
John T. Jankovic, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge
National Laboratory, PO Box 2008 MS 6473, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6473

Operations staff have been engaged in the development of engineering  
and administrative controls for handling materials at the nano-scale  
from teh onset of the design phase for the Center for Nanophase  
Materials Sciences (CNMS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  
Industrial hygiene staff have developed a control banding strategy  
for operations in the facility. This coupled with an industrial  
hygiene strategy has positioned CNMS staff and guests with a uniform  
understanding of expectations for use of these materials. In this  
talk, Mr. Jankovic will provide an overview of the control banding  
strategy.


CHAS 28
Development and use of an industrial hygiene sampling method for
nanoparticulates
Randy Ogle, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National
Laboratory, PO Box 2008 MS 6488, Oak Ridge, TN 37931-6488
Operations staff have been engaged in the development of engineering  
and administrative controls for handling materials at the nano-scale  
from teh onset of the design phase for the Center for Nanophase  
Materials Sciences (CNMS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  
Industrial hygiene staff have developed a control banding strategy  
for operations in the facility. This coupled with an industrial  
hygiene sampling strategy has positioned CNMS staff and guests with a  
uniform understanding of expectations for use of these materials. In  
this talk, Mr. Ogle will provide an overview of the sampling  
methodology use for nanoparticulates.

CHAS 29
Occupational medicine implications of nanoparticulates
Peter Lichty, Health Services, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,  
PO Box
2008 MS6488, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6488

Occupational medicine works hand-in-hand with work place monitoring  
and emerging research to better understand the body's response to  
interactions with nanoparticles. This talk will focus on the  
occupational medicine response to increasing use of nanoparticulates  
in the workforce.

CHAS 30
NIOSH: Nanotechnologies safety and health initiatives
Mark Hoover, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health,  
PO Box
2008 MS 6230, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6230

NIOSH is the leading federal agency conducting research and providing  
guidance on the occupational safety adn health implications and  
applications of nanotechnology. This research focuses NIOSH's  
scientific expertise, and its efforts, on answering the questions  
that are essential to understanding these implications and applications:
 How might workers be exposed to nano-sized particles in teh  
manufacturing and industrial use of nanomaterials?
 How do nanoparticles interact with the body's systems?
 What effects might nanoparticles have on teh body's systems?
In this talk, Dr. Hoover will discuss key NIOSH safety and health  
initiatives related to nanotechnology, including the development of  
the Nanoparticle Information Library.

CHAS 31
Challenges of analysis of environmental nanoparticles
Gary Casuccio, R.J. Lee Group, 350 Hochberg Road, Monroeville, PA 15146
As the scientific community has entered the world of nanotechnology,  
safety and health professionals are faced with unique challenges in  
workplace monitoring. R.J. Lee Group is an innovative materials  
characterization company that excels in the analysis of materials  
using chemical and microscopy techniques. In this talk, Mr. Casuccio  
will discuss emerging analytical techniques and their applications in  
worker safety and health.

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