From: "Weeks, Robert W" <rweeks**At_Symbol_Here**LANL.GOV>
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] Hydrogen Sulfide Cylinder SOPs
Date: May 30, 2012 9:12:53 AM EDT
Reply-To: DCHAS-L <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU>
Message-ID: <CBEA9513.10346%brandon.chance**At_Symbol_Here**>


One thing to remember is that sometimes instrumentation fails and that goes for both electronic and the human instrument. Particularly, the H2S odor threshold is very low, 0.0005 ppm and one becomes aware of the hazard. However, the complication is that upon extended exposure the olfactory nerves become fatigued and do not detect the odor even though H2S is still present. One then erroneously assumes the H2S has dissipated and in actuality it is still present and can create injury up to and including death. Also, one should be aware of the fact that the TLV for H2S is lower than the PEL.


-----Original Message-----
From: DCHAS-L Discussion List [mailto:dchas-l**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU] On Behalf Of Chance, Brandon
Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2012 6:01 AM
Subject: [DCHAS-L] Hydrogen Sulfide Cylinder SOPs

CHAS Members,

I have recently been tasked with creating a cylinder management plan for hydrogen sulfide for a lab currently under construction. This is a bit out of my comfort zone, hence my post. Here is the information I have so far:

1. We are looking at most likely a 3-10L bottle.
2. The lab will contain vented gas cabinets and hydrogen sulfide continuous monitoring systems
3. Personal monitors will be worn by all personnel

I am specifically trying to but together an internal movement SOP that includes the following:

1. Transport from the loading dock via a series of underground corridors to a freight elevator 2. Movement from the basement to the third floor in the elevator (I assume that the cylinder cart should be placed on the elevator, appropriate floor pressed, and a second person will meet the cylinder at the top - this would also require "proctors" placed in the middle floors to keep people from getting on) 3. Disconnection of "in-use" cylinder from the regulator within the gas cabinet (should the cylinder be ran to virtually empty, or should a bit of pressure be left within the cylinder)?
4. Connection of full cylinder
5. Transport of "empty" cylinder to the dock for pickup in reverse of step 2

Obviously the above can be done in reverse with the "empty" cylinder being taken down followed by the full cylinder coming back up. What PPE concerns should I have for transport and are there specific regulation that point towards transportation via occupied spaces for H2S?

Brandon Chance, M.S.

Safety and Environmental Compliance Manager Office of Building Operations & HSSE Texas A&M University at Qatar brandon.chance**At_Symbol_Here**

PO Box 23874 | Doha, Qatar
TAMUQ Building Room 225DA | Education City

(o) +974.4423.0495 | (m) +974.6668.3552 | SkypeIn USA 001.281.764.1776

It's Time For Texas A&M

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