Date: Tue, 19 Jan 2010 14:16:27 -0500
Reply-To: DCHAS-L Discussion List <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**LIST.UVM.EDU>
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From: ILPI <info**At_Symbol_Here**ILPI.COM>
Subject: Re: DOT information from MSDSs
In-Reply-To: <6BA58D2D-102D-4029-8D32-ED597BE49070**At_Symbol_Here**>

I got a phone call from the OSHA webmaster today, and we tracked down that article I referenced below.

The title is "Hazard Communication: A Review of the Science Underpinning the Art of Communication for Health and Safety" and the URL is sg/hazcom/hc2inf2.html   I have updated the references made to this document in our MSDS FAQ's content section, faq/partc.html

Here's another quote from the article, one I offer without commentary: "Further, females are more likely to look for warnings than males".   Please resist the urge to open a discussion on THAT one.


On Jan 15, 2010, at 2:29 PM, ILPI wrote:

My point is (and was) - don=92t depend on an MSDS to always have correct information, particularly in respect to DOT proper shipping names and hazard status.

Two dated factoids from a 1997 OSHA-contracted study (OSHA broke the original URL, but I've submitted a request to see if they still offer the document on-line)

1. "one expert panel review established that only 11% of the MSDSs were found to be accurate in all of the following four areas: health effects, first aid, personal protective equipment, and exposure limits. Further, the health effects data on the MSDSs frequently are incomplete and the chronic data are often incorrect or less complete than the acute data"

2. "on average, literate workers only understood about 60% of the health and safety information on the MSDSs associated with the hazardous chemical, in all three comprehensibility studies."  Note: this is one of the reasons we offer our MSDS Demystifier: sds/ref/demystify.html

As a followup to the toxicological source question,  29 CFR 1910,  Subpart Z - Toxic and Hazardous Substances lists  materials specifically regulated by OSHA, so if the material is on that list, you should be able to find very specific and useful info about it on OSHA's web site.  A simple list of everything covered in that is here: http://www.osha.g ov/dsg/hazcom/ghd053107.html#c   On the same page I just referenced is an Appendix B, Information Sources to Assist with Hazard Determination: http://www.osha.g ov/dsg/hazcom/ghd053107.html#b  and it's got a great list (even if they have our MSDS site still listed as being at the U of KY....that moved over 10 years ago).


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