Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2011 13:46:23 +0000
Reply-To: DCHAS-L Discussion List <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**LIST.UVM.EDU>
Sender: DCHAS-L Discussion List <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**LIST.UVM.EDU>
From: "Robin M. Izzo" <rmizzo**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU>
Subject: Re: Automatic sash closers
In-Reply-To: <DC9B6B340B77DE43BFFBBFD7F28C2FD90F96A063**At_Symbol_Here**>

One more thing about sash closers...

If you're buying them to retrofit a hood or if you're buying new hoods and 
adding this feature, you'll need to check to see if you need to have it tes
ted for UL rating.  The sash closer is considered a separate component that
 when added to the hood, may change the UL status.


Robin M. Izzo, M.S.
Associate Director, EHS
Princeton University
609-258-6259 (office)
How many legs does a dog have if you call the tail a leg?  Four.  Calling i
t a tail a leg doesn't make it a leg. 
~ Abraham Lincoln

-----Original Message-----
From: DCHAS-L Discussion List [mailto:DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**LIST.UVM.EDU] On Behalf Of Ro
bin M. Izzo
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2011 6:25 AM
To: DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] Automatic sash closers


It depends.  We have them on all of the 400+ hoods in our new Chemistry bui
lding and it's become a standard for us to have them on all new hoods.  The
y can be worth it, but there are caveats:

- Depends on the product.  We tested several types before finding ones that
 work well.  If the product is relatively new, I'd be concerned.  We found 
that sash closers with a combination of both proximity and motion detectors
 are more reliable than those with just one technology.  Even so, some need
 a lot of adjustments to work for shorter people.  Same with the sash senso
r that stops the sash from closing if something is in the path of the sash.
  Some are more sensitive (better) than others.

- Depends on whether auto open/close or just auto open.  Many companies pus
h the automatic sash that opens upon approach and closes after some time.  
We've found that chemists don't like the auto open because they like to vie
w things through the closed sash, but biologists like the auto open.  Hoods
 in an open lab design where people walk by the hoods will have the sash op
ening more often than needed.

- Depends on how easy it is to adjust the timing.  Users will defeat the au
tomatic sash if they find it too inconvenient.  Some lab workers will want 
the sash to remain open for longer than the initial programming.  When the 
user knows that the timing can be adjusted, they can ask for it and take ad
vantage of it in a good way.

- Depends on whether you're going to monitor usage.  Lab workers WILL defea
t the sash closer.  Not all of them, but at least some.  If there is a feed
back system, someone could be reviewing the usage reports to identify where
 people may have defeated the closer and someone can follow up on that.

- Depends on how vigorous your maintenance program is.  Like any extra tech
nology, it breaks, malfunctions, etc.  Some lab workers are going to stuff 
the sash stop sensor with cotton, some with tape over it, some will stop wo
rking because the sensors get dusty.  

I'm a big fan of the sash closers we have purchased over the past few years
.  We'd done a study to measure how long our organic chemistry researchers 
were actually standing/sitting in front of the hoods.  It was suprisingly l
ow.  The sash closers really do make a difference both for energy savings a
nd safety.  It's refreshing to walk into a sparsely populated chemistry lab
 during lunchtime or lectures and seeing most of the sashes closed.  Huge d
ifference from before the closers.


From: DCHAS-L Discussion List [DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**LIST.UVM.EDU] on behalf of Paul Dove
r [Paul.Dover**At_Symbol_Here**MONASH.EDU]
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2011 3:41 AM
To: DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**LIST.UVM.EDU
Subject: [DCHAS-L] Automatic sash closers

Dear all,

We are fitting out an area with 20 new fume hoods. The question is are 'aut
omatic sash closers' worth the $2k extra per hood?
From both a safety and an environmental/energy saving point of view you wou
ld think so, but I've had no actual experience using them.
Any recommendations or advise?

Thanks in advance, Paul


Paul Dover
Resources Manager (Medicinal Chemistry & Drug Action)

Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Monash University (Parkville Campus)
381 Royal Parade, Parkville
Victoria 3052, Australia

Tel: Int + 61 3 9903 9551
Fax: Int + 61 3 9903 9143
E-mail: paul.dover**At_Symbol_Here**

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