From: Neil Edwards <Neil.Edwards**At_Symbol_Here**LIU.EDU>
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] Two Questions re chemical transport
Date: April 17, 2012 11:18:58 AM EDT
Reply-To: DCHAS-L <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU>
Message-ID: <006c01cd1be2$66ebca20$34c35e60$**At_Symbol_Here**edu>

Some years ago, this university closed one of its campuses. We drove out there and selected the chemicals and equipment that we wanted to be transferred to us, with the remainder to be designated for disposal. Apparently, nobody there thought it was important to make certain that bottles of solid chemicals be tightly closed. When the waste removal company that was contracted to take care of the entire move came in to overpack the chemical bottles in drums that they then filled with sand, vermiculite, and other fillers for the move, at least 20% of the solid chemicals ended up contaminated with the fillers and had to be discarded. If you decide to have a third party do the moving, I highly recommend going through all containers first to make sure they are tightly closed and then adding a few turns of stretchable plastic tape to each bottle. I wish someone had thought of that here.


Neil Edwards
Department of Chemistry
LIU Post
720 Northern Boulevard
Brookville, NY 11548-1300
Email: neil.edwards**At_Symbol_Here**liu.edu


From: Beth Brubaker >
Reply-To: DCHAS-L >
Date: Mon, 16 Apr 2012 10:05:45 -0500
To: >
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] Two Questions

I won't attempt to comment on what is allowed. We moved into a new building in 2009. One of the GOOD decisions we made was to contract with a waste disposal firm to move our chemicals. We could have done this job, given enough time and resources. These guys were in and out in no time. There was no doubt that they knew the chemical compatibilities and were in compliance with all applicable regulations. It was a headache we didn't have to deal with, at a time when there were plenty of other things to be done. I suspect that we were moving more chemicals than you are - at least in terms of diversity. We're a smallish regional university, and have the full range of teaching and research labs. However, you will still have plenty of hazardous materials involved in your move. It just takes breaking one bottle of XYZ. You should have a firm available to do a lab pack in your area, and perhaps you could negotiate a good cost to include disposal of the things you DON'T wan!
t to move at the same time. This cost should come out of the building/construction budget.

My answer might change if the move is REALLY close and you could accomplish this safely with a cart in an hour - no vehicles, no streets to cross, no students around. We had to cross a street, which adds all sorts of complexity to the legal issues.

I'd be happy to give you more details if you're interested.

From: DCHAS-L Discussion List [mailto:dchas-l**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU] On Behalf Of drsamples**At_Symbol_Here**COMCAST.NET
Sent: Friday, April 13, 2012 6:40 PM
To: DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] Two Questions

I have a related question to the chemical transport question. A new science building at a rural college in California is now being finished, so they will have to pack and transport all of the chemicals from the old building to the new building. These would be chemicals that are typical for general first-year inorganic chemistry. Are the faculty and lab tech allowed to do the packing and moving of chemicals themselves or are they required to hire outside specialists? Are there any rules or prudent guidelines to follow in moving and supervising the move?

Thank you,

Marjorie Samples
Los Rios College District

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