From: Steven Charles Hunt <steve**At_Symbol_Here**SHIPMATE.COM>
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] odor question
Date: September 19, 2012 4:36:33 PM EDT
Reply-To: DCHAS-L <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU>
Message-ID: <BLU171-W370909B00F7B62F79D8E50C89B0**At_Symbol_Here**phx.gbl>

Yes...odor maybe abused by paper in books as they are decomposing.  They may have become wet at some point.

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 19, 2012, at 16:07, Dan Herrick <herrickdan**At_Symbol_Here**HOTMAIL.COM> wrote:

Greetings all,

We are investigating an Indoor Air Quality issue in an infrequently used faculty office which is full of books, papers, a computer server, etc.  The odor is mothballs, and we cannot locate the source.  (Believe me, we've been trying!)  We've done a lot of work already, investigating, ruling things out, etc.  My question to this list is:

Has anyone had an odor issue where a mothball odor was caused by something other than mothballs?

I am aware that the chemical which causes the distinctive odor in mothballs is either naphthalene (older products) or 1,4-Dichlorobenzene (newer products).  This faculty member is not doing any chemistry but rather investigates materials and their mechanical properties.

All thoughts are appreciated.

Thank you,





Daniel C. Herrick

EHS Coordinator, MIT

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Laboratory for Manufacturing & Productivity (LMP)

Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE)

Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics

email   herrickd**At_Symbol_Here**

phone 617-253-2338

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

77 Massachusetts Avenue, Room 3-056

Cambridge, MA 02139-4307

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