From: Ben Ruekberg <bruekberg**At_Symbol_Here**CHM.URI.EDU>
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] Eating and Drinking in Laboratories
Date: December 3, 2012 8:14:16 AM EST
Reply-To: DCHAS-L <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU>
Message-ID: <1b98.724d4c93.3deddfe6**At_Symbol_Here**>

Not quite what you wanted, but I understand that LSD and most artificial sweeteners were “discovered” by contamination of cigarettes and possibly other consumables.  I believe that there are accounts of these serendipitous events.




From: DCHAS-L Discussion List [mailto:dchas-l**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU] On Behalf Of ACTSNYC**At_Symbol_Here**CS.COM
Sent: Monday, December 03, 2012 5:59 AM
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] Eating and Drinking in Laboratories


Now if you were asking about accidental ingestions in theater we couldn't even list them all.  There are even two from Broadway.  Like Rita Moreno stealing a sip of beer on stage during "notes" after a rehearsal only to find out someone was using the can for an ammonia cleaner.  And Brook Shields who always put both her glass of water and the peroxide for her hair in tumblers on her dressing table and the curtain had to go up very late one night.

Then we have the tradition in film locations of putting the Craft Table (loaded with food and beverages) near the work so people can eat at will.  They want to do this even when the shooting location is in an abandoned building with lead paint chips raining from the ceiling or special effects dusts cover surfaces.

But there is not the same kind of press coverage of lab workers.  Just how many chemists and/or their universities are going to make it known that food got contaminated in a lab and someone got sick?   Hell, you can barely get all the facts when someone is killed in a school lab.

So there are occassions when people ask for statistics and cases, you need to point out that some things are just damn obvious and you really have better things to do with your time.


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