From: Vivian L. Longacre <vlongacr**At_Symbol_Here**CALPOLY.EDU>
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] Lab Waste accumulation bottle preference
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2015 16:24:12 +0000
Reply-To: DCHAS-L <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU>
Message-ID: BLUPR0801MB1604310382AD42BD98C52CE7C83E0**At_Symbol_Here**BLUPR0801MB1604.namprd08.prod.outlook.com
In-Reply-To <561FA37D.7030904**At_Symbol_Here**appstate.edu>


We have always used recycled PVC coated 2.5 or 4L bottles as waste jars in the teaching labs and most research areas.  This size of bottles fit nicely in the smaller plastic shoe boxes we use as secondary containment (economical, as we can get them on sale for $2).   We used to use large plastic funnels on the waste jars, but we could never get the students or faculty to take off the funnels and cap the jar at the end of lab, or in research areas- no matter how much training we did, or notes we left as reminders!  After lamenting our problem to a newly hired tech, he introduced us to the eco-funnels and we switched over. This tech told us they had the same problem at his prior university and were always getting cited on their local fire inspections for open waste bottles.  After they switched to the eco-funnels, the Fire Dept. was satisfied and even when not clipped, did not cite as it's a pretty good closure system.

It has worked really well for us.  You can simply close the lid and clip to seal.  Once clipped, they will fully contain the liquid should the bottle tip over.  They have a nice sturdy plastic filter inside that catches solids and stir bars, as others have noted.  We use the large ones on the carboys we occasionally use for a large waste stream.  They aren't cheap, but neither is a citation. 

As far as our waste stream in the chemistry labs, most bottles are switched out daily as we have high usage in our lab areas, and taken to a accumulation area.  The chemistry department inspects all labs weekly for hazardous waste that needs to be picked up, so we rarely have of date compliance issues.  This inspection record is kept in a logbook and has worked well to show due diligence in CAL EPA inspections.  


?Vivian Longacre | Safety Training Specialist
Environmental Health & Safety | Cal Poly State University
San Luis Obispo, CA | 805.756.6628



From: DCHAS-L Discussion List <dchas-l**At_Symbol_Here**med.cornell.edu> on behalf of Samuella B. Sigmann <sigmannsb**At_Symbol_Here**APPSTATE.EDU>
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2015 6:00 AM
To: DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] Lab Waste accumulation bottle preference
 
The info below is from the company,  I have never actually asked an EPA person and so are trusting this.

In the teaching lab where we use them, we are collecting aqueous metal ion waste and do empty the containers at the end of the week.  The lids do seal shut and we use the full system and the funnels screw onto the container so they stay in the container for the week.  With the full system, it is unlikely that they tip, but the funnels are supposed to remain sealed.

Sammye

Safety Regulations

The following Federal Regulations (EPA / OSHA) can be met through regular use of ECO Funnel® systems and secondary containment:

  • 29 CFR 1910.1450: "Avoidance of routine exposure: develop and encourage safe habits; avoid unnecessary exposure to chemicals by any route."
  • 29 CFR 1910.1450: "Indiscriminate disposal by pouring waste chemicals down the drain or adding them to mixed refuse for landfill burial is unacceptable. Hoods should not be used as a means of disposal for volatile chemicals."
  • 40 CFR 264.173: "A container holding hazardous waste must always be closed during storage except with it is necessary to add or remove waste."
  • 40 CFR 264.175:"The containment system must have sufficient capacity to contain 10% of the volume of containers or the volume of the largest container, whichever is greater..."
  • 29 CFR 1910.1450: "Stockrooms/Storerooms: ...chemicals which are highly toxic or other chemicals whose containers have been opened should be in unbreakable secondary containers...
http://www.calpaclab.com/about-the-eco-funnel/

On 10/14/2015 10:41 AM, Barbara Foster wrote:

In what ways are these funnels compliant with EPA regs? Do they have vent openings in the area where the device is attached to the waste bottle? Does the lid completely seal shut?  Is it a completely closed system that will not leak/spill (from vent openings/loose lid) if accidentally knocked over? Do you leave the funnels on the waste bottles all of the time or do you remove them at the end of the academic lab session and recap the bottles?

 

Our lab staff use standard 4L glass bottles (repurposed) for our liquid waste and use wide-mouth containers for our solid waste/used weigh boats/used filter paper waste in the general chemistry labs. Also, you should consider the method of waste removal at your institution. Do you remove your waste on a daily basis to a 90-day area? Or do you accumulate waste in a satellite area? This would determine the type/size of waste containers that will be needed for your labs. Do your organic labs use micro-scale? This would produce very little waste (with the exception of the acetone wash waste) and would require much smaller containers than would be needed for your general chemistry labs.

 

All of these factors are important and another key factor is that the container must be big enough to be properly labeled/dated according to the policies of your institution.

 

Barbara L. Foster

College Safety Officer

Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

West Virginia University

304-293-2729 (desk)

304-276-0099 (mobile)

 

From: DCHAS-L Discussion List [mailto:dchas-l**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU] On Behalf Of Samuella B. Sigmann
Sent: Tuesday, October 13, 2015 1:28 PM
To: DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] Lab Waste accumulation bottle preference

 

I love Eco Funnel systems.  They are EPA compliant and the strainer catches magnets  We collect in these and transfer to others to discard.  They are not cheap, but are definitely worth it.  However, that being said, safety coated bottles are not cheap either.  Usually, you can find the product you want at the link below and order it through VWR (may have to have your rep quote a price) and it will be cheaper than Lab Safety.  Lab Safety has been very good about sending us replacement parts for the clasps, which will fail eventually.

http://www.calpaclab.com/eco-funnels/

As for narrow mouth containers, I do not see any advantage to those.  I prefer wide mouth, safety coated bottles.  All of our bottles are recycled 2.5 or 4 L solvent or acid bottles.  Anything that comes through the stockroom empty has all manufacturers labels removed, is rinsed with an appropriate solvent (added to waste), and thoroughly washed and allowed to air dry (no lid in storage).  I only use plastic bottles for nitric acid waste - a lesson learned.

S-

On 10/13/2015 11:00 AM, Stuart, Ralph wrote:

I'm getting ready to order some waste accumulation bottles for our laboratories and wonder if there is a practical reason to have narrow mouth bottles rather than wide mouth bottles. It seems like the wide mouth bottles would eliminate the need for a funnel during the filling process and lead to less exterior contamination of the waste bottle. However, standard practice appears to be narrow mouth bottles and I wonder if this is due to a specific practical reason or inertia?
 
Thanks for any thoughts on this.
 
- Ralph
 
 
Ralph Stuart, CIH, CCHO
Chemical Hygiene Officer
Keene State College
 
ralph.stuart**At_Symbol_Here**keene.edu

 

--

***************************************************************************************

We, the willing, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible for the ungrateful.  We have done so much, for so long, with so little, we are now qualified to do everything with nothing. Teresa Arnold

Samuella B. Sigmann, NRCC-CHO

Senior Lecturer/Safety Committee Chair/Director of Stockroom

A. R. Smith Department of Chemistry

Appalachian State University

525 Rivers Street

Boone, NC   28608

Phone: 828 262 2755

Fax: 828 262 6558

Email: sigmannsb**At_Symbol_Here**appstate.edu

 


--

--
******************************************************************************

We, the willing, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much, for so long, with so little, we are now qualified to do everything with nothing. Teresa Arnold

 

Samuella B. Sigmann, NRCC-CHO

Senior Lecturer/Safety Committee Chair/Director of Stockroom

A. R. Smith Department of Chemistry

Appalachian State University

525 Rivers Street

Boone, NC 28608

Phone: 828 262 2755

Fax: 828 262 6558

Email: sigmannsb**At_Symbol_Here**appstate.edu

 

 

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