From: David H Silberman <davidhs**At_Symbol_Here**STANFORD.EDU>
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] FYI - Plagiarism by GW safety official
Date: Wed, 4 Nov 2015 01:15:36 +0000
Reply-To: DCHAS-L <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU>
Message-ID: BN3PR02MB1270C66B4190074200A9323CD22A0**At_Symbol_Here**

In many cases of using safety material created by others, it's a simple matter of courtesy: ask for permission.  I expect that in the majority of cases a "used by permission" statement that acknowledges the creator of the material would be granted, thus avoiding any copyright issues. Some materials — such as developing web based content — incur considerable cost and a modest reimbursement through licensing would help offset development expenses.

David H. Silberman

Director, Emeritus

Health and Safety Programs

Stanford University School of Medicine

Land:    415-621-6162

Cell:      415-590-1050

Fax:       415-621-2021

From: DCHAS-L Discussion List <dchas-l**At_Symbol_Here**> on behalf of Chance, Brandon <bchance**At_Symbol_Here**MAIL.SMU.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, November 3, 2015 6:36 AM
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] FYI - Plagiarism by GW safety official
I agree with Harry.  While plagiarism in journals is definitely grounds for discipline, I find that in the safety world programs are lifted and reused all the time – some with permission and I assume some are without.  I have been to a number of presentations at conferences where universities offer their audit/inspection checklists up for grabs and even tell the attendees feel free to use it as they see fit.  

There are many cases that, while looking for program examples online, I have come across multiple institutions with identical written content with only names and phone numbers changed.  

With all of our goals ultimately being the safety of our employees and students, I wonder how many of us would even object to someone using one of our own programs as long as it meets their needs.

Based on this article, it seems as there were a number of other underlying performance issues in addition to plagiarism that let to this employee’s dismissal.  


Brandon S. Chance, M.S., CCHO
Associate Director of Environmental Health and Safety
Office of Risk Management
Southern Methodist University 
PO Box 750231 | Dallas, TX  75275-0231
T) 214.768.2430 | M) 469-978-8664

"… our job in safety is to make the task happen, SAFELY; not to interfere with the work…” Neal Langerman

From: DCHAS-L Discussion List <dchas-l**At_Symbol_Here**> on behalf of "Harry J. Elston" <helston**At_Symbol_Here**MIDWESTCHEMSAFETY.COM>
Reply-To: DCHAS-L <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Monday, November 2, 2015 at 10:22 PM
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] FYI - Plagiarism by GW safety official

Interesting article.  Personally I would not consider lifting parts of well-written safety plans to be actionable plagiarism (who has the original "Do not pipette by mouth" reference?), though some may disagree.  However, copying some 18 paragraphs from various sources without citation in a manuscript submitted for publication is pretty bad.  I expect he'll be looking for employment soon.


On Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 8:38 AM, Yanchisin, Mark <mark**At_Symbol_Here**> wrote:

Interesting article about one of our peers.



Mark Yanchisin

Coordinator for Clinical and Laboratory Safety Programs

Environmental Health and Safety

University of Florida

POB  112190 Bldg 179 Newell Dr.

Gainesville, Fl  32611-2190

O- 352-392-1591

F- 352-392-3647



“Just because you are in compliance doesn’t mean you are out of danger.”  Mike Rowe “Deadliest  Catch”



Harry J. Elston, Ph.D., CIH
Company Information
Twitter: **At_Symbol_Here**MidwestChemSafe

Previous post   |  Top of Page   |   Next post

The content of this page reflects the personal opinion(s) of the author(s) only, not the American Chemical Society, ILPI, Safety Emporium, or any other party. Use of any information on this page is at the reader's own risk. Unauthorized reproduction of these materials is prohibited. Send questions/comments about the archive to
The maintenance and hosting of the DCHAS-L archive is provided through the generous support of Safety Emporium.