From: "Secretary, ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety" <secretary**At_Symbol_Here**DCHAS.ORG>
Subject: [DCHAS-L] CDC Grand Rounds Presents ÒStrengthening a Culture of Laboratory Safety,Ó
Date: Wed, 9 Dec 2015 19:12:57 -0500
Reply-To: DCHAS-L <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**MED.CORNELL.EDU>
Message-ID: 450AD74E-13DB-4EE2-820A-DD2D4BA7ED36**At_Symbol_Here**

From: Centers for Disease Control & Prevention [mailto:cdc**At_Symbol_Here**]
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2015 2:04 PM
Subject: CDC Grand Rounds Presents ‰??Strengthening a Culture of Laboratory Safety,‰?? on Tuesday, December 15, at 1 p.m. (ET)

We are pleased to present the December session of CDC Public Health Grand Rounds, ‰??Strengthening a Culture of Laboratory Safety.‰?? This session will be available via live webcastfrom CDC headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia on Tuesday, December 15, at 1 p.m. (ET).

Laboratory safety is supported by complex and ever-changing science. Safety standards and practices evolve as scientists learn more about the materials they handle regularly. Today, more than 2,000 laboratory scientists in labs across CDC work with specimens to identify new health threats, stop outbreaks, and gain new knowledge. Laboratory work saves lives and protects people. Labs are often working with the deadliest germs, toxins, and environmental hazards in the world.

A strong culture of laboratory safety helps the world-class scientists at CDC work in the safest possible environment, but this work is not without risk. As new information becomes available, safety practices must change to remain up to date and relevant. Every lab is different. Effective safety practices in one lab may not be successful in another. Labs must stay organized, developing their own internal quality controls to provide safety and security for their scientists and for the public.

Please join us for this session of Public Health Grand Rounds as our panel discusses how standards of laboratory safety have improved over the years, what we‰??ve learned from past incidents, and how establishing safety protocols and training systems can lead to an overall culture of workplace safety, resulting in continued public trust in our science and recommendations.

Future Grand Rounds session topics include the role of modeling in emergency response; chronic fatigue syndrome; and addressing health disparities in early childhood.

Email your questions about this topic before or during the session. Follow us on Twitter #cdcgrandrounds

CDC‰??s Public Health Grand Rounds Presents:
‰??Strengthening a Culture of Laboratory Safety‰??
Tuesday, December 15, 2015
1:00 p.m. ‰?? 2:00 p.m., ET

Global Communications Center (Building 19)

Alexander D. Langmuir Auditorium

Roybal Campus

Presented By:

Stephan Monroe, PhD
Associate Director for Laboratory Science and Safety
Office of the Associate Director for Laboratory Science and Safety, CDC
‰??Evolution of Laboratory Safety Standards‰??

Conrad P. Quinn, PhD
Chief, Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch
National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC
‰??Quality, Safety and Public Health Impact of Lab Science: A Case Study‰??

Joseph Kanabrocki, PhD, CBSP
Associate Vice President of Research Safety
Professor of Microbiology
University of Chicago
‰??Establishing a Culture of Safety in an Academic Research Institution: Teaching Safety to Scientists‰??

Facilitated By:

John Iskander, MD, MPH, Scientific Director, Public Health Grand Rounds
Phoebe Thorpe, MD, MPH, Deputy Scientific Director, Public Health Grand Rounds
Susan Laird, MSN, RN, Communications Director, Public Health Grand Rounds

For non-CDC staff interested in viewing the session:
A live external webcast will be available. For individuals who are unable to view the session during the scheduled time, the archived presentation will be posted 48 hours after each session.

For non-CDC staff who wish to attend in person:
Due to security measures at CDC‰??s Roybal campus, non-CDC staff who wish to attend these sessions in person must have prior clearance and a US state-issued photo ID (e.g., driver‰??s license, US passport).

Target Audience: Physicians, nurses, epidemiologists, pharmacists, veterinarians, certified health education specialists, laboratorians, others


‰?¢ List key measures of burden of disease involving morbidity, mortality, and/or cost.
‰?¢ Describe evidence-based preventive interventions and the status of their implementations.
‰?¢ Identify one key prevention science research gap.
‰?¢ Name one key indicator by which progress and meeting prevention goals is measured.

CE certificates can be printed from your computer immediately upon completion of your online evaluation. A cumulative transcript of all CDC/ATSDR CE‰??s obtained through the TCE Online System will be maintained for each user. We hope that this will assist CDC staff and other public health professionals to fulfill the requirements for their professional licenses and certificates.

Learn more about continuing education on the Grand Rounds website.

Previous post   |  Top of Page   |   Next post

The content of this page reflects the personal opinion(s) of the author(s) only, not the American Chemical Society, ILPI, Safety Emporium, or any other party. Use of any information on this page is at the reader's own risk. Unauthorized reproduction of these materials is prohibited. Send questions/comments about the archive to
The maintenance and hosting of the DCHAS-L archive is provided through the generous support of Safety Emporium.