From: Ken Smith <ken.smith**At_Symbol_Here**UCOP.EDU>
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] Shower/Eyewash Station Audible and Visible Alarms
Date: Wed, 26 Oct 2016 17:09:37 +0000
Reply-To: ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU>
Message-ID: DM2PR0601MB1167DD7CFB52E0966CC63AD68CAB0**At_Symbol_Here**DM2PR0601MB1167.namprd06.prod.outlook.com
In-Reply-To <1109037139E1524980CF9CBEB2476618010AD28F14**At_Symbol_Here**UMF-EX10EMB1.umflint.edu>


FYI a better design is this one. The graduated volume marking and powered pump make it easy to use and empty. Remember in addition to the monthly flush a periodic flow test is needed that measures rate of water delivery (20 gpm).

 

https://uk.vwr.com/store/content/externalContentPage.jsp?path=/uk.vwr.com/en_GB/kunststoff_safety_shower_testunit.jsp

 

The other problem with the bag / shower curtain type testers is that you cannot measure the diameter of the spray pattern easily. It needs to be 20 in diameter at 5 ft. from the floor. With a rigid system it's possible to set the funnel at that fixed height and observe the over spay to verify the spray pattern diameter.

 

Just some suggestions.

 

 

Ken Smith, CHP CIH RRPT

University of California

Office of the President

Executive Director of EH&S

http://risksafety.universityofcalifornia.edu/
voice (510) 882-3499

 

From: ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety [mailto:DCHAS-L@PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Wilhelm, Monique
Sent: Tuesday, October 25, 2016 9:04 AM
To: DCHAS-L@PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] Shower/Eyewash Station Audible and Visible Alarms

 

They do make safety shower testing kits, on wheels even.  See http://www.enconsafety.com/en/parts-and-accessories/testing-equipment/mobile-shower-test-assembly/stu1,%20stu2/, though I prefer that the chute have a rod on it because I am short.

 

 

Monique Wilhelm

Laboratory Manager

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

University of Michigan – Flint

 

From: ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety [mailto:DCHAS-L@PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Laurie Yoder
Sent: Tuesday, October 25, 2016 11:33 AM
To: DCHAS-L@PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] Shower/Eyewash Station Audible and Visible Alarms

 

Our renovated building came on line last year and regular eyewash flushing didn't start until this fall. It's a small department (8 labs and 4 prep rooms) and the eyewash configuration is such that flushing is not convenient. The facilities crew configured a wheelbarrow with various hoses attached to catch the water but it's still a pain, and now they are struggling to find enough people-hours to complete the task on a weekly basis. There is talk of it becoming part of the CHO position (that's me...) 

 

I will say that the water coming out of the new units was disgusting (gunk and smell) for a while. I think it's improving with regular flushing, but it gives one pause when considering putting one's face in there.

Laurie

 

 

On Mon, Oct 24, 2016 at 5:20 PM, Vivian L. Longacre <vlongacr@calpoly.edu> wrote:

Hmmm... just curious, how do you do weekly flushing of eyewashes as per ANSI standard?  And the shower flushing and flow testing?

 

We did not do flush units on a new science building that came online 3 years ago.  This is all new to me.

 

Vivian Longacre 

Safety Training Specialist

Environmental Health & Safety

Cal Poly State University

San Luis Obispo, CA

 

Direct 805.756.6628


From: ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety <DCHAS-L@PRINCETON.EDU> on behalf of Chance, Brandon <bchance@MAIL.SMU.EDU>
Sent: Monday, October 24, 2016 1:40:06 PM
To: DCHAS-L@PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: [DCHAS-L] Shower/Eyewash Station Audible and Visible Alarms

 

DCHASers,

 

During a recent lab renovation, the contractor presented to us wall mounted shower/eyewash stations that have both an audible alarm and visible strobe when activated.  The unit also has the ability to communicate back tot he BMS system upon activation.  While this all sounds fine and dandy, it has raised a few questions on my end.

 

1.  Is this a new standard being used for installations?  I definitely see some practical purposes for this in order to alert others that an emergency has occurred, but I have not come across this before. 

2.  This raises some design dilemmas on our end.  

A.  We are installing these as flush mounted systems, so the units strobe and audible alarms would be above the drop ceiling (or we would have to relocate the alarm indicators). 

B.  For obvious reasons, the contractor was originally spec-ing out installation on walls without electrical just for cost and ease of plumbing.  If alarms are necessary, power must be ran to the units, thus increasing scope and cost. 

 

In general, I was just curious as to what kind of new installs other universities were currently putting in place.  

 

 

Regards,

 

Brandon S. Chance, M.S., CCHO

Associate Director of Environmental Health and Safety

Office of Risk Management

Southern Methodist University 

PO Box 750231 | Dallas, TX  75275-0231

 

"… our job in safety is to make the task happen, SAFELY; not to interfere with the work…” Neal Langerman

 

 

--- This e-mail is from DCHAS-L, the e-mail list of the ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety. For more information about the list, contact the Divisional secretary at secretary@dchas.org

--- This e-mail is from DCHAS-L, the e-mail list of the ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety. For more information about the list, contact the Divisional secretary at secretary@dchas.org



 

--

Laurie M. Yoder
Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Hygiene Officer
Chemistry
Eastern Mennonite University

540.432.4420

 

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