From: "Wilhelm, Monique" <mwilhelm**At_Symbol_Here**UMFLINT.EDU>
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] TiO2 Classification ?
Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 15:01:40 +0000
Reply-To: ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU>
Message-ID: 1109037139E1524980CF9CBEB2476618010AF19AA3**At_Symbol_Here**UMF-EX10EMB1.umflint.edu
In-Reply-To <15ccd24f4dc-73f4-15584**At_Symbol_Here**webprd-m15.mail.aol.com>


Thank you so much, Monona.  You totally need to write down all of this historical stuff that you have in your head for the rest of us.  Your wealth of knowledge on these things always seems to amaze me.

 

Monique Wilhelm

Laboratory Manager

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

University of Michigan - Flint

 

From: ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety [mailto:DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU] On Behalf Of Monona Rossol
Sent: Wednesday, June 21, 2017 8:13 PM
To: DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] TiO2 Classification ?

 

The TiO2 story is SO VERY interesting and has so many lessons in for students

 

Yes, all powders are not good to inhale, but the ability to cause lung cancer is unique.  There are several mechanisms, and the one suspected in TiO2 is a surface activity phenomenon.

 

About 30 years ago, NIOSH listed Ti02 as a carcinogen.  No one believed them or joined in this opinion. One reason people were skeptical was the studies were split between positive and negative results.  NIOSH persisted.  Then IARC re-evaluated the data.  And basically, when the studies were divided by particle size, the respirable particles caused cancer and the inhalable ones did not.

 

So IARC listed it 2B next.  And at the end of this month, I will probably be writing a short article about the E.U.'s decision to also list it.

 

And about this same time, NIOSH reexamined the data as well because most TiO2 pigments now are in nanoparticle size.  And the first ever workplace air quality standard, the NIOSH REL, was set for a nanoparticle in 2010.  So here's the standards for TiO2:

 

10 mg/m3 inhalaable

 2.4 mg/m3 respirable

0.3 mg/m3 nanoparticle

 

As for an "overshelming wide impact,"  damn right.  It is the base of most makeup, many sun screens, most consumer paints, and more.  It can be used to shows students how replacing Lead Carbonate in consumer wall paints without testing the substitute's toxicity probably is not good thinking.  There are many other white pigment/mineral that might have been tried.

 

And perhaps, chemicals used in many thousands to tons/year by millions of consumers should be tested for chronic effects before dumped on the public?  Could be a good thing.

 

 

Monona Rossol, M.S., M.F.A., Industrial Hygienist

President:  Arts, Crafts & Theater Safety, Inc.

Safety Officer: Local USA829, IATSE

181 Thompson St., #23

New York, NY 10012     212-777-0062

actsnyc**At_Symbol_Here**cs.com   www.artscraftstheatersafety.org


 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Wilhelm, Monique <mwilhelm**At_Symbol_Here**UMFLINT.EDU>
To: DCHAS-L <DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU>
Sent: Wed, Jun 21, 2017 7:08 pm
Subject: Re: [DCHAS-L] TiO2 Classification ?

Hello Everyone,



Help me out here: aren't all powders bad to inhale? What is the basis for the change in classification? Will this have any impact on the IARC rating? Does anyone know what the ingestion studies indicate?



I no longer work with TiO2, but this just seems like something that could have an overwhelmingly wide impact.



Thank you,

Monique



Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10



From: DCHAS Secretary<mailto:secretary**At_Symbol_Here**DCHAS.ORG>
Sent: Wednesday, June 21, 2017 7:57 AM
To: DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU<mailto:DCHAS-L**At_Symbol_Here**PRINCETON.EDU>
Subject: [DCHAS-L] Chemical Safety headlines from Google (15 articles)



Chemical Safety Headlines From Google
Wednesday, June 21, 2017 at 7:56:01 AM

A membership benefit of the ACS Division of Chemical Health and Safety
All article summaries and tags are archived at http://pinboard.in/u:dchas

Table of Contents (15 articles)

RESEARCH FINDS COMMON HOUSEHOLD CHEMICALS LEAD TO BIRTH DEFECTS IN MICE
Tags: us_VA, laboratory, discovery, environmental, cleaners

MSC UNANIMOUSLY AGREES THAT BISPHENOL A IS AN ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR
Tags: Europe, public, discovery, environmental, other_chemical

FIRE AT SGV MOTEL 6 TURNS UP 'HONEY OIL' LAB
Tags: us_CA, public, fire, injury, clandestine_lab

'SPONTANEOUS INGNITION' OF OILY RAGS SPARKED HOUSE FIRE IN SOUTH RENO
Tags: us_NV, public, fire, injury, other_chemical

2ND WEST VIRGINIA INDUSTRIAL PLANT EXPLOSION KILLS 1
Tags: us_WV, industrial, explosion, death, thiols

EVACUATIONS LIFTED IN HENDERSONVILLE AFTER CRASH CAUSES CHEMICAL SPILL
Tags: us_TN, transportation, release, response, sulfuric_acid

COMPANY SAYS IT WILL CLEAN UP CHEMICAL FROM CAPE FEAR RIVER
Tags: us_NC, industrial, follow-up, environmental, waste

SCIENTISTS URGE CAUTION ON COMMON ANTIMICROBIAL CHEMICALS TRICLOSAN AND TRICLOCARBAN
Tags: Europe, public, discovery, environmental, other_chemical

INDIANA WATER PARK CLOSES AFTER KIDS SUFFER CHEMICAL BURNS FROM WATER
Tags: us_IN, public, release, response, chlorine

DETONATIONS HEARD AFTER EXPLOSIVES FOUND AT BUCKS COUNTY HOME
Tags: us_PA, public, discovery, response, explosives

HAZMAT CREWS CALLED AFTER FIRE AT BEREA POOL
Tags: us_OH, public, fire, response, pool_chemicals

DYNAMITE FIREWORKS PRESENTS BEST PRACTICES FOR FOURTH OF JULY HOME FIREWORKS DISPLAYS
Tags: us_IN, public, discovery, environmental, fireworks

CHEMICALS AREN'T PEOPLE. THEY SHOULDN'T BE PRESUMED INNOCENT
Tags: Canada, public, discovery, environmental

REPORT: WANAQUE RESERVOIR COULD BE THREATENED BY DANGEROUS CHEMICAL
Tags: us_NJ, public, discovery, environmental, other_chemical

FIREFIGHTERS ATTEND CHEMICAL SPILL AT MURDOCH TAFE CAMPUS IN PERTH
Tags: Australia, laboratory, release, response, unknown_chemical


---------------------------------------------

RESEARCH FINDS COMMON HOUSEHOLD CHEMICALS LEAD TO BIRTH DEFECTS IN MICE
Tags: us_VA, laboratory, discovery, environmental, cleaners

A new study at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) and the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech has found a connection between common household chemicals and birth defects.

Known as quaternary ammonium compounds or "quats," the chemicals are often used as disinfectants and preservatives in household and personal products such as cleaners, laundry detergent, fabric softener, shampoo and conditioner, and eye drops. The research demonstrated a link between quats and neural tube birth defects in both mice and rats.

"These chemicals are regularly used in the home, hospital, public spaces, and swimming pools," said Terry Hrubec, associate professor of anatomy at the VCOM-Virginia campus and research assistant professor in the veterinary college's Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology. "Most people are exposed on a regular basis."

Hrubec investigated the effect of two commonly used quats: alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride and didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride. These are often listed on ingredient lists as ADBAC and DDAC, respectively, and are valued for their antimicrobial and antistatic properties, as well as their ability to lower surface tension. Hrubec found that exposure to these chemicals resulted in neural tube birth defects -- the same birth defect as spina bifida and anencephaly in humans.

---------------------------------------------

MSC UNANIMOUSLY AGREES THAT BISPHENOL A IS AN ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR
Tags: Europe, public, discovery, environmental, other_chemical

The Member State Committee (MSC) supported the French proposal to additionally identify Bisphenol A as a substance of very high concern because of its endocrine disrupting properties which cause probable serious effects to human health. The committee also agreed to identify the substance PFHxS as an SVHC.

Helsinki, 16 June 2017 - The Member State Committee unanimously agreed on the identification as substances of very high concern (SVHCs) of:

4,4'-isopropylidenediphenol (bisphenol A, BPA) (EC 201-245-8, CAS 80-05-7), proposed by France, due to its endocrine disrupting properties for human health;
Perfluorohexane-1-sulphonic acid and its salts (PFHxS), proposed by Sweden, due to their very persistent and very bioaccumulative (vPvB) properties.
Bisphenol A is already listed in the Candidate List due to its toxic for reproduction properties. At the MSC meeting earlier this week, MSC unanimously agreed on its additional identification as an SVHC because of its endocrine disrupting properties which cause probable serious effects to human health which give rise to an equivalent level of concern to carcinogenic, mutagenic, toxic to reproduction (CMRs category 1A or 1B) substances.

ECHA will include PFHxS in the Candidate List and will update the current entry for BPA accordingly by the end of June 2017. Companies may have legal obligations with respect to these substances upon publication of the updated Candidate List.

---------------------------------------------

FIRE AT SGV MOTEL 6 TURNS UP 'HONEY OIL' LAB
Tags: us_CA, public, fire, injury, clandestine_lab

SOUTH EL MONTE, CA Firefighters putting out a fire Sunday in several rooms at a Motel 6 in South El Monte discovered what authorities believe was a "Honey Oil" marijuana extraction laboratory, where two suspects and a dog suffered burn injuries.

And investigators also believe another suspect, with possible injuries, might have left the location prior to their arrival, the Sheriff's Department reported.

One of the burn victims was a female, according to a Los Angeles County Fire Department dispatcher. The condition of the burn victims, who were taken to an area hospital including the dog, to a veterinarian were not immediately known.

---------------------------------------------

'SPONTANEOUS INGNITION' OF OILY RAGS SPARKED HOUSE FIRE IN SOUTH RENO
Tags: us_NV, public, fire, injury, other_chemical

RENO, Nev. (News 4 &amp; Fox 11) The "spontaneous ignition" of oil-stained rags started a fire that destroyed a south Reno home and injured one firefighter, according to the city's fire marshal.
The house fire was reported just after 3 p.m. on Monday, June 19, on Oakhaven Drive. Two people have been displaced, and a pet is still missing.
Fire Marshal Tray Palmer said in a statement that investigators found a pile of the rags on the exterior deck. The rags ignited and the fire spread to surrounding combustible material, reaching the attic through an exterior eave.
"Spontaneous Ignition is the initiation of combustion of a material by an internal chemical or biological reaction that has produced sufficient heat to ignite the material," Palmer said.

---------------------------------------------

2ND WEST VIRGINIA INDUSTRIAL PLANT EXPLOSION KILLS 1
Tags: us_WV, industrial, explosion, death, thiols

Another person has been killed in an explosion at a West Virginia industrial plant where two people were killed last month, authorities said Tuesday.

Officials said the explosion Tuesday morning was at Midland Resource Recovery, a company based in Ontario, Canada, that odorizes natural gas.

In a preliminary report, the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection said contractors at the facility outside Philippi were disassembling a 30-gallon (115-liter) tank, trying to render tanks safe from the previous explosion May 24 that killed two and injured one.

The agency says a preliminary report shows one other person was injured and an unknown quantity of Mercaptan, the chemical used to give natural gas an odor, was spilled.

A woman who answered the telephone at the company's headquarters in Ontario declined to comment.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has begun an investigation. OSHA spokeswoman Lenore Uddyback-Fortson said the victim was an employee of Specialized Professional Services Inc. The company based in Washington, Pennsylvania, handles hazardous material. Calls to the company were not immediately returned Tuesday.

---------------------------------------------

EVACUATIONS LIFTED IN HENDERSONVILLE AFTER CRASH CAUSES CHEMICAL SPILL
Tags: us_TN, transportation, release, response, sulfuric_acid

HENDERSONVILLE, Tenn. - The evacuation order has been lifted in Hendersonville after a crash caused a chemical leak.

The incident involving a tanker truck carrying sulfuric acid happened around 7 p.m. Tuesday on Rockland Road near Freehill Road.

No injuries were reported in the crash, but since the hazardous material was involved, first responders closed Rockland Road from West Main Street to Freehill Road.

Several nearby businesses were evacuated. A neighbor in the area told NewsChannel 5 they were asked by law enforcement to evacuate within a quarter mile of the crash site.

The Hendersonville Fire Department worked to contain the material, which leaked from the tanker into a drainage ditch.

The evacuation order has been lifted. Crews hope to reopen Rockland Road soon.

---------------------------------------------

COMPANY SAYS IT WILL CLEAN UP CHEMICAL FROM CAPE FEAR RIVER
Tags: us_NC, industrial, follow-up, environmental, waste

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE The chemical giant that has been releasing an unregulated chemical into the Cape Fear River for more than 35 years announced Tuesday that it will immediately start a process to capture that substance.

In a release entitled, "Chemours announces voluntary actions to respond to North Carolina community," the Delaware-based chemical company announced it will take steps starting Wednesday to capture all wastewater containing the GenX chemical, remove the substance and dispose of it.

"We are capturing the byproduct GenX from the waste streams of the fluoromonomer production and disposing of it," Gary Cambre, a Chemours spokesman, wrote in an email.

Those steps may not, however, be enough to stave off a federal Environmental Protection Agency investigation into Chemours' activities at the Fayetteville Works site.

"This investigation will allow EPA to determine whether Chemours is in compliance with requirements of the order to control releases to the environment at the Fayetteville, N.C., facility," an EPA spokeswoman wrote in an email.

Tuesday evening, N.C. Department of Environmental Quality (NCDEQ) Secretary Michael Regan said in a statement that Chemours' announcement was "a step in the right direction," but NCDEQ and the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services plan to continue to investigate the issue "until we have answers to address the concerns of downstream water users."

---------------------------------------------

SCIENTISTS URGE CAUTION ON COMMON ANTIMICROBIAL CHEMICALS TRICLOSAN AND TRICLOCARBAN
Tags: Europe, public, discovery, environmental, other_chemical

There are two ingredients, triclosan and triclocarban, that are used in several cleaning products such as soaps, toothpastes, detergents, carpets, paints etc. They are mainly used to kill the microbes such as bacteria, fungi and viruses. These chemicals however persist in the environment and continue to pose a risk says a new study.

Triclosan and triclocarban are commonly used in products intended for washing [e.g., an estimated 96% of triclosan is used in products that are intentionally disposed of down the drain, such as soaps and detergents - Image Credit: Kurhan / Shutterstock

Researchers have said that their use may benefit but it is not worth the risk. The statement, The Florence Statement on Triclosan and Triclocarban, was released this week by more than 200 scientists and health professionals from 29 different countries and was published in the Environmental Health Perspectives journal. The statement urges manufacturers and communities to limit the production as well as use of triclosan and triclocarban and also look closely at other antimicrobials. All products with these two chemicals need appropriate labeling says the statement along with adequate warnings.

According to the experts, these chemicals get accumulated in land, water and wildlife. They tend to come back to humans and cause harm. The risks far outweigh their benefits. Dr. Ted Schettler, science director of the Science and Environmental Health Network and one of the signatories of the statement said that this was an attempt to draw attention to the situation. These two chemicals are at the top of their hit list since they have been used for so long and exposures to them are so widespread.

These chemicals that kill microbes can come back into animals and humans the researchers add. They cause harmful effects on the animals' hormone systems. This leads to problems with reproduction and developmental problems. These can be extrapolated to humans as well. These chemicals could be linked to decreased growth of the fetuses or unborn babies, low birth weight of babies, preterm births, smaller head circumference of male babies at birth and other problems. Triclosan has also been linked to allergies and worsening of asthma cases especially among children.

---------------------------------------------

INDIANA WATER PARK CLOSES AFTER KIDS SUFFER CHEMICAL BURNS FROM WATER
Tags: us_IN, public, release, response, chlorine

CHICAGO (CBS) It's almost officially summer, but a Northwest Indiana water park is closed right now after several scary moments.

As CBS 2's Mai Martinez reports, at least 5 children suffered chemical burns after getting in the water.

It was a disappointing trip to Seven Peaks Water Park in Porter, Indiana for Mike Miller and his granddaughter, Lilly.

"I was shocked that it's not open," Miller said. However, he found the reason it's closed even more shocking.

According to the Porter County Health Department, several children suffered chemical burns after visiting the park.

"The demand chlorine feeder apparently has been down for a while. What they were trying to do was manually chlorinate the system, and when you do that you have no way of knowing if you're putting into little or too much, and obviously they got way too much," Keith Letta, the department's administrator, told CBS over the phone. "If you put too much in, it gets extremely caustic and will cause chemical burns."

The problem centered around the kiddie pool.

Stacy Bethel's daughter was there Thursday.

---------------------------------------------

DETONATIONS HEARD AFTER EXPLOSIVES FOUND AT BUCKS COUNTY HOME
Tags: us_PA, public, discovery, response, explosives

OTTSVILLE, Pa. (WPVI) -- Authorities remain on the scene in Bucks County after chemical explosives were discovered near a home in Ottsville, Pa.

Controlled detonations could be heard periodically through the night Tuesday and into the early morning hours on Wednesday.

The situation unfolded Tuesday, after authorities arrived at the property in the 8700 block of Easton Road.

They were there to serve a mental health commitment warrant on a 70-year-old man when they uncovered the chemical explosives and a large number of weapons and ammunition.

Bomb experts were called.

Chopper 6 HD was overhead as two explosive experts wearing gas masks carried out what were said to be explosive liquid chemicals.

They moved the chemicals far away to the back of the property. Officials also carried away various materials from a shed in the back of the property.

All of this occurred as Easton Road was shut down between Route 412 and Churchill Road and residents were told to shelter in place.

---------------------------------------------

HAZMAT CREWS CALLED AFTER FIRE AT BEREA POOL
Tags: us_OH, public, fire, response, pool_chemicals

BEREA, OH (WOIO) -
Firefighters and hazmat crews responded to a fire at a community pool in Berea early Tuesday morning.

The fire was reported at 2:45 a.m. at the Longbrooke housing development's community pool.

According to fire officials, the pump building caught fire. The building is also used to store pool chemicals. When crews arrived, the pump building was fully engulfed. Hazmat crews were requested to the scene to deal with the pool chemicals.

Firefighters from Strongsville and officials from the Ohio EPA and Department of Natural Resources also assisted with the incident.

---------------------------------------------

DYNAMITE FIREWORKS PRESENTS BEST PRACTICES FOR FOURTH OF JULY HOME FIREWORKS DISPLAYS
Tags: us_IN, public, discovery, environmental, fireworks

Dynamite Fireworks has more than 40 years of experience in the fireworks business in the greater Chicago area, and is considered a trusted information source for the safe, legal, and responsible handling of fireworks. As the Fourth of July approaches, Dynamite Fireworks owner Kris Zambo reminds potential home fireworks users of the five best practices for safe and responsible fireworks displays.

1. Perimeter
Home fireworks shows are, by necessity, launched very close to people, structures, and sometimes animals. Creating a perimeter around the launching space at a distance of 500 feet is essential to maximizing safety. A highly visible physical barrier, such as caution tape, is highly recommended.

2. Clear Launch Space
The entire surface area within the perimeter boundary must be cleared of obstructions, fire hazards such as dry leaves, and tripping hazards such as stones. If the weather is dry, it is important to check for local fireworks bans. And even if there is not a local fireworks ban, wetting down the launch area is recommended.

3. Safe Handling Techniques
Fireworks must never be pointed at any animal, structure, or person, including the person who is launching them. Fireworks should never be lit in the hands, and duds should never be re-lit. Children should be kept well outside the perimeter barricade, and teens should be carefully supervised when launching fireworks. The person launching the fireworks should remain sober and clear-headed throughout the show.

4. Water and a Fire Extinguisher
A bucket of water (or a garden hose) allows fireworks users to thoroughly wet down debris and duds before disposing of them. If sparklers are available, all users should be directed to douse them in water rather than dropping them on a table or throwing them immediately in the trash. In addition, a fire extinguisher that is rated for chemical fires is an essential tool. If anything catches on fire, it should be extinguished immediately, or the area must be evacuated and 911 called.

5. Legality and Quality Concerns
Known dangerous fireworks, including M-80s and Cherry Bombs, are illegal under federal law. Many state and local ordinances are more restrictive. Responsibility falls to the homeowner and fireworks user to ensure that all fireworks launched are legal in their area.
Homemade fireworks and low-quality fireworks are not illegal in some jurisdictions, but they can be highly dangerous. Selecting only high-quality fireworks from a trusted supplier is the best way to ensure that the fireworks behave as predicted.
Fireworks carry inherent risks, but following these five best practices can dramatically minimize the dangers. Although backyard fireworks shows are fun, it is important to always use common sense.

---------------------------------------------

CHEMICALS AREN'T PEOPLE. THEY SHOULDN'T BE PRESUMED INNOCENT
Tags: Canada, public, discovery, environmental

A parliamentary committee review of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act our most important environmental law has largely flown under the radar.

But there are enormous implications for the health of Canadians living today, and in the future, contained in the reforms recommended in the majority report released last week by the Commons Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development.

As law professors who have studied the regulation of toxic chemicals in Canada for many years, we urge Parliament to embrace these recommendations as a once-in-a-generation opportunity.

Implementation would make the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) more effective in preventing pollution and protecting all Canadians from the risks posed by toxins in the environment. As it stands, air pollution kills 7,000 Canadians every year, but Canada is the only wealthy industrialized national that lacks enforceable national standards for air quality.

Therefore, we strongly support proposals on enforceable national standards for air and water quality, stricter timelines, and better enforcement mechanisms.

---------------------------------------------

REPORT: WANAQUE RESERVOIR COULD BE THREATENED BY DANGEROUS CHEMICAL
Tags: us_NJ, public, discovery, environmental, other_chemical

RINGWOOD, N.J. - A dangerous chemical at the Ringwood Superfund site -- where Ford Motor Co. dumped toxic paint sludge 50 years ago -- could threaten the Wanaque Reservoir, NorthJersey.com reports .

The probable carcinogen - called 1,4-dioxane - has not been found in the reservoir, but high levels have been detected in groundwater and brooks feeding the body of water that provides drinking water to as many as 3.5 million people, the story says.

A new report, written for the reservoir's operator, the North Jersey District Water Supply Commission, recommends that a system be built to pump contaminated groundwater to the surface and decontaminate it to prevent the pollution from reaching the reservoir, the story says.

An EPA spokesperson told NorthJersey.com that officials are reviewing the report, and are still confident that the reservoir is safe from the chemical, the story says.

---------------------------------------------

FIREFIGHTERS ATTEND CHEMICAL SPILL AT MURDOCH TAFE CAMPUS IN PERTH
Tags: Australia, laboratory, release, response, unknown_chemical

Firefighters are attending a chemical spill at the Murdoch campus of the South Metropolitan TAFE.

The Department of Fire and Emergency Service initially said there was a large fire at the campus, but it has since been confirmed to be a non-hazardous chemical spill.

The spill is believed to have happened shortly after 8:00am in a science laboratory.

Eleven fire appliances attended the scene.

---------------------------------------------

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